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Verse of the Day (January 23, 2020)

Verse of the Day (January 23, 2020) #BMSeminary – [wisdom] Gives people the capacity to understand the world in light of God’s Word and purposes; believers need it to rejoice in trials. Wisdom is an important theme in James: although mentioned explicitly elsewhere only in 3:13-18, it is tied into some of James’s other themes (e.g., the tongue), and wisdom writings influence James’s style. [generously] Or “single-mindedly,” in the sense that God’s single, undivided intent is to give us those gifts we need to please him. Such “single-mindedness” is a fundamental theme in James (v. 8; 4:4-10). (Zondervan Study Bible)

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Verse of the Day (January 22, 2020)

Verse of the Day (January 22, 2020) #BMSeminary – The three imperatives ask, seek, and knock are in the present tense of the original language, suggesting both perseverance and frequent prayer. Fervent and continual prayer is to be made on behalf of those for whom we are concerned. God promises to answer all genuine prayer, v.8. Everything we need for spiritual success has been promised to us. God leaves us no excuse for failure. Both Jesus (Luke 18:1) and Paul (1 Tim. 2:1) emphasized the importance of prayer, noting that people ought always to pray. Prayer includes asking and getting answers from God. But it is more than just asking; it is confession, adoration, thanksgiving, and fellowship with God. By its nature, prayer is talking with God. It is the basis of the successful Christian life, and is so important that not praying is considered a sin (1 Sam. 12:23). When we pray, we should follow the model prayer Jesus gave His disciples and address it to our heavenly Father—beginning with adoration, including thanksgiving and confession of sins, making reconciliation with others, praying for our needs and the needs of others, and concluding in Jesus’ name (6:9–15; John 14:14). Illustration: Jesus pointed out that God heard the prayer of a humble publican rather than that of a proud Pharisee (Luke 18:14). Application: God will answer our prayer when we obey Him (1 John 3:22), confess sin (Ps. 66:18), abide in Christ (John 15:7), ask according to the will of God (1 John 5:14), ask in faith (Mark 11:24), have pure motives (James 4:3), and live peaceably with our mate (1 Pet. 3:7). (First Reference, Gen. 3:8–13; Primary Reference, Matt. 7:7; cf. 1 John 5:14, 15.) (KJV Study Bible)

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Verse of the Day (January 21, 2020)

Verse of the Day (January 21, 2020) #BMSeminary – Mocked (outwitted, outfoxed): To disobey God’s commands and then escape divine punishment would be to outwit God, thus making a mockery of Him and His Word. Soweth means “does,” “practices.” Reap could also be said, “be requited,” “recompensed.” Contextually, the Galatians cannot disregard the command to support their Christian instructors (v. 6) and escape divine discipline. For expands the principle of verse 7 to wider application. Soweth to his flesh means to conduct oneself by the evil dictates and desires of the sinful nature, thus practicing the deeds of the flesh (5:19–21). Such a person shall . . . reap corruption, that is, be requited with eternal destruction. Soweth to the Spirit means to live by His enabling help in accord with the Spirit’s prompting and leading, thus cultivating the fruit of 5:22, 23. Such a person shall . . . reap life everlasting, that is, be rewarded with eternal life. (KJV Study Bible)

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Verse of the Day (January 20, 2020)

Verse of the Day (January 20, 2020) #BMSemiary – this epistle on Christian living, James opens with a most crucial topic: the trials of life. These verses describe the various testings—whether from the world and Satan, or from God—into which godly Christians fall (Gr. peripiptō). These “negative” experiences are to be accepted with great joy, not for the sake of the trial itself but because of the positive work God can accomplish through the testing. The words in verses 2 and 3 (temptations and trying) are often regarded as virtually synonymous. If this were true, then trials themselves would produce spiritual maturity. But they do not. Often, testings make Christians bitter instead of better, with no spiritual growth occurring. The Greek word for “trying” (dokimion) might be better translated as “approving.” It is not merely one’s presence in such trials but one’s victory over them that brings spiritual growth and maturity. Those Christians whom God can use the most are those whom God has bruised the most. (KJV Study Bible)

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Verse of the Day (January 19, 2020)

Verse of the Day (January 19, 2020) #BMSeminary – Happy Lord’s Day! Jesus illustrated His point by comparing the willingness of a human father to give his child a gift with our heavenly Father who will gladly give us what we need. The term evil (v. 11) is used here of man’s sinful nature. Even sinful men are kind to their children; therefore, how much more shall your heavenly Father delight to answer your prayers. Hence, rather than judging others, we are to treat them as we would like to be treated. The statement in verse 12, Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them, is the biblical injunction often called the “Golden Rule.” This is the law and the prophets indicates that the statement made here by Jesus is not intended to be novel, but rather a summarization of the second table of the law. (KJV Study Bible)

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Verse of the Day (January 18, 2020)

Verse of the Day (January 18, 2020) #BMSeminary – Though idolatry was the cause of Israel’s failure and the focus of Paul’s warning to this church, four other evil characteristics of Israel also seem to have marked the Corinthians. These characteristics also resulted in the Israelites dying in the wilderness. The apostle did not want his readers to overreact and become paranoid as they considered Israel’s record either. Failure was not inevitable. The temptations the Corinthians faced were not unique, and the Lord would give them grace to handle any temptation they might face. [Note: For other verses dealing with God’s part in temptation, see Exodus 16:4; Deuteronomy 8:2; 1 Chronicles 21:1; Job 1:12; 2:6; Matthew 6:13; and James 1:13.] God has promised to enable us to do His will in any and every situation, and He will stand true to His promise (cf. Mat 28:20; et al.). He provides a way of escape with every temptation He allows to touch us, namely, power to overcome every temptation. The use of the definite article “the” with both “temptation” and “way of escape” points to a particular way of escape that is available in each temptation. Paul did not mean there is one way of escape that is available regardless of the temptation. If we deliberately put ourselves in the way of temptation and so put God to the test (1Co 10:9), we are not taking advantage of the way of escape. We may fall. Therefore we should flee from idolatry (1Co 10:14; cf. 1Jn 5:21). The Corinthians were putting themselves in danger by continuing to attend cultic meals, which they needed to stop doing. Nevertheless God had made a way of escape open to them, as He had with Israel. The Lord’s Supper and the Christian fellowship connected with it was His divine replacement of this idolatrous activity (1Co 10:16). This whole section (1Co 10:1-13) deals with the dangers involved in participating in pagan activities. Some of these activities are wrong in themselves because they involve idolatry, and Christians should not participate in them. If we should participate, we need to be aware that in doing so we are walking on the edge of a precipice over which many other believers have fallen, including the Israelites in the wilderness. We dare not underestimate the danger of the situation or overestimate our own ability to handle it. We need to walk closely with God every day. (Expository Notes of Dr. Constable)

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Verse of the Day (January 17, 2020)

Verse of the Day (January 17, 2020) #BMSeminary – Since God is producing in the Philippians the willing and doing of His good and perfect will (v. 13), there can be no legitimate reason for murmurings and disputings. Not only are they forbidden to complain about the difficulties and persecutions that will befall them in carrying out God’s good pleasure, but quarreling among themselves is also prohibited. If the readers obey the commands of verses 12–14, they will be [become] blameless [i.e., no finger of accusation can justly be pointed at them] and harmless (i.e., morally pure). Due to party strife and bickering, this is not now true of them. As the sons of God . . . in the midst of a crooked and perverse nation (generation), they are to be without rebuke—without incurring spiritual damage. The proper place for God’s people is among the lost. For only in such a position can true Christian witness be borne and influence for the gospel be effectively exerted. Yet believers must remain “without rebuke” in that they suffer no moral damage by contact with the unsaved. Then among unbelievers they will shine as lights in the world. As stars are readily noticeable in a dark sky, so healthy Christian lives stand out in testimony among the lost and give credence to one’s witness. (KJV Study Bible)