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Verse of the Day (March 28, 2020)

Verse of the Day (March 28, 2020) #BMSeminary – Paul follows his teaching that God desires “all people to be saved” with the declaration that the saving gospel is all the work of God. There is one God, says Paul, and one Mediator, who sacrificed himself to ransom sinners. Because he is the “one God,” he is the God of every nation, tongue, and tribe—every soul. All must come to him for salvation. On top of this, the one God has one Mediator—“there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus” (v. 5). Jesus is the only go-between. Because he is both God and man, he fully represents both sides. The apex of God’s saving work is the blood ransom paid by the God-man Christ Jesus, “who gave himself as a ransom for all” (v. 6). So we see that everything in the gospel is of God; and the gospel can save any soul, anywhere, anytime. That is why Paul exultingly proclaims at the beginning of Romans, “I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes” (Rom. 1:16). For us, as we follow the flow of thought here in 1 Timothy 2, it means that we are: (1) to pray for the gospel’s outreach to all people, and (2) to live godly lives that promote the preaching of the gospel. From 2:8 to the end of the letter, Paul will now turn his attention to calling Timothy and his church to godly conduct for the sake of the gospel. He begins by addressing four groups in sequence: men, women, overseers, and deacons. (Gospel Transformation Study Bible)

BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (March 26, 2020)

Verse of the Day (March 26, 2020) #BMSeminary – For reinforces the assertion that the proof of the believers’ salvation, provided through their courage in persecution, comes from God. This justification lies in the fact of the Philippians’ being divinely granted the dual privilege of believing in Christ and suffering for Him. Thus the assurance of their salvation is from God, just as is their suffering for Jesus, for the latter was the occasion providing the former. (KJV Study Bible, HarperCollins)

BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (March 25, 2020)

Verse of the Day (March 25, 2020) #BMSeminary – In these verses John introduces one of the great effects of the gospel, namely, the transformation of life that occurs in the genuine gospel-believer. John speaks of this transformation as one from “darkness” into “light.” To “walk in darkness” means to pursue a pattern of life apart from God, who is light (vv. 5–6). “Walking in the light” means both fellowship with God (v. 6) and fellowship with other believers (v. 7). It does not mean that we will never sin. After all, in this very passage John reminds us that when we do sin, God has provided a trustworthy ground of forgiveness: “The blood of Jesus his Son cleanses us from all sin” (v. 7). When we base our confessions of sin on this fact, God is “faithful and just to forgive us our sins” and also to “cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” (Gospel Transformation Study Bible)

BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (March 23, 2020)

Verse of the Day (March 23, 2020) #BMSeminary – Mankind understandably may look on tragedy as the curse of God, as Job’s friends did. Trials are, however, the means through which God’s blessings can come. One’s endurance in and victory over trials bring God’s blessings. Christians, therefore, are not instructed to seek avenues of escape. God desires that they mature in the situation rather than move from it (cf. Rom. 5:3–5; 1 Pet. 1:6, 7). He does, however, promise to provide an escape if the testing becomes unbearable (1 Cor. 10:13). God’s people need to meditate more on James 1:12 than 1 Corinthians 10:13. The reason for this, and why God allows trials in the lives of His people, is revealed in the Mosaic Law: “That he might humble thee, and that he might prove thee, to do thee good at thy latter end” (Deut. 8:16). (KJV Study Bible, Harper Collins)

BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (March 22, 2020)

Verse of the Day (March 22, 2020) #BMSeminary – Happy Lord’s Day! Finally may be rendered “from now on” or “henceforth.” The spiritual battle Christians are engaged in exists “from now on” until the Lord’s return: there is no quarter given, no cease-fire, no temporary truce, no cessation of hostilities. “From now on” till the end there is all-out war. The remainder of the verse may be paraphrased, “Let yourselves constantly be strengthened by the Lord, more precisely, by His mighty power.” Put on (Greek ingressive aorist imperative) denotes a sense of urgency, demanding immediate action. To stand has military overtones. This verb was used in classical Greek meaning to resist the enemy and hold a critical position in battle. The wiles of the devil (or, “the Devil’s strategy”): Satan carefully devises schemes and tactics against believers. (KJV Study Bible, Harper Collins)

BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (March 20, 2020)

Verse of the Day (March 20, 2020) #BMSeminary – When we taste and see “that the Lord is good” (cf. Ps. 34:8), we “put away” the bitter fruit of unrepentance. It has been said that Christ will not taste sweet to us until sin tastes bitter, and the reverse is true as well. Christ and sin cannot both look beautiful to us; as the appeal of one rises, the other falls. When we are savoring the Bread of Life (or, as symbolized in v. 2, “pure spiritual milk”), we lose our taste and appetite for the dusty things of earth. Even the law becomes a delight when we obey it in our freedom from its curse (Ps. 40:8; 119:77). Once we have tasted the goodness of Christ and his gospel, we will long for more (1 Pet. 2:2), and it is this longing that fuels our continued growth. By “the pure spiritual milk” of the Word of God and especially the gospel (cf. 1:25), believers “grow up into salvation.” Gospel grace not only converts us at a single point in time; it also changes us over time so that we become by practice what Christ has already made us by grace. This truth is similar to Paul’s words in Titus 2:11–12, where we learn that it is the grace of God that trains us to renounce ungodliness and worldly passions—grace leads to godliness as we are drawn by Christ’s love to honor him more and more in Christian maturity. (Gospel Transformation Study Bible)

BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (March 19, 2020)

Verse of the Day (March 19, 2020) #BMSeminary – The word fruit is significant for three reasons. (1) It means the result, product, outcome, or effect produced by the Spirit in the believer’s life. (2) Unlike “the gifts of the Spirit” (plural), only some of which are given to a Christian, each believer is to have all nine virtues composing “the fruit of the Spirit” (singular). (3) As fruit on a tree takes time to grow and mature, so the Spirit does not cultivate these virtues in the believer’s life overnight. Love is the willing, sacrificial giving of oneself for the benefit of another without thought of return. Joy is gladness of heart. Peace is tranquility of mind, freeing one from worry and fear. Long-suffering is patience with others, the opposite of a short temper, a disposition quietly bearing injury. Gentleness is kindness. Goodness is generosity. Faith here is dependability. Meekness is gentleness, that is, courtesy and consideration in one’s relations with others. Temperance is self-control, that is, the ability to harness and control one’s passions and lusts. (KJV Study Bible, Harper Collins)