BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (June 27, 2020)

Verse of the Day (June 27, 2020) #BMSeminary – {vv. 21-28} Entrance into the reign of God is a valuable treasure and a great joy to those who experience it (13:44–46), but it involves the hardship of living in a way that is out of step with a sin-ravaged world. For Jesus, this meant experiencing the shame of rejection from the intellectual elites of his own culture, and a form of death—crucifixion (16:21)—reserved for the least valued and least powerful members of his society. From the perspective of a world in rebellion against God, to choose a life leading to such a death seemed like “folly” (1 Cor. 1:18–25). Despite the profound insight Peter has just had into Jesus’ identity, and despite the Savior’s promise to build his church upon that truth (Matt. 16:13–20), Peter is not yet sufficiently transformed by the gospel to understand just how dramatic is the conflict between Jesus and the sinful world (vv. 22–23) and how pivotal will be the role of the church in binding hearts to heaven (vv. 18–19). Jesus therefore instructs Peter and all of his disciples (including, through this written account, disciples today) that entering God’s kingdom by following him entails putting oneself at odds with the values and goals of the sinful world (vv. 24–28). Living in a way so dramatically different from the unbelieving world can feel shameful today, just as it did for the early Christians (v. 24; cf. 1 Cor. 1:18–25; 2:1–5; Gal. 6:14; Heb. 12:2). Jesus encourages his disciples not to believe the world’s lie that following him is shameful. What the world believes to be “life” is not life at all but really the loss of life, while the disciple of Jesus has chosen the path of true life that leads to lasting joy (Matt. 16:25–26; Eph. 2:1–3; 4:17–19). The believer may not experience the fullness of that joy until eternity, when the true nature of a life spent gaining the whole world versus a life spent following Jesus will become clear (Matt. 16:27). But we can experience the joy of the gospel even now, as we live with the assurance of God’s constant presence, eternal care, and plans for our ultimate good (11:28–30; 13:44–46). [Gospel Transformation Study Bible]

BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (June 26, 2020)

Verse of the Day (June 26, 2020) #BMSeminary – {bear a grudge} Retain or maintain vengeful feelings toward someone (cf. Nah 1:2). {love your neighbor as yourself} Do what is good for others just as you naturally love doing what is good for yourself. Such love contrasts with taking vengeance or bearing a grudge against someone. Therefore, v. 18 probably does not imply that people need to learn to love themselves in order to love their neighbors. Instead, in NT terms it amounts to fulfilling the “Golden Rule” (Matt 7:12). Do good for your neighbor since that is the way you would want them to treat you. This is the source for the second of Jesus’ two great commandments in Matt 22:36-40 and Mark 12:28-31. In Luke 10:25-37 Jesus clarifies that “neighbor” includes those whom a person does not know personally-even those with whom a person would not normally associate. Lev 19:34 anticipates this when it calls for such love toward the “foreigner” who lived among them, not just the native Israelite, and then supports this by reminding them that they were “foreigners” in Egypt. They would have wanted to be treated well there, so they should treat the foreigners among them well. [Zondervan Study Bible]
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Verse of the Day (June 24, 2020)

Verse of the Day (June 24, 2020) #BMSeminary – {But the Lord is faithful} Here the term “faith” is used in its OT sense of faithfulness. Jesus is exactly opposite of the evil men of 2Th 3:2 (cf. 1Th 5:24). {strengthen} In the Septuagint (LXX) this term was used of establishing something like a city. It came to be used metaphorically of establishing or confirming a person (cf. Rom 16:25; 1Th 3:2; 2Th 2:17; 2Th 3:3). The faithful Lord will establish and guard His own from evil, evil men, and the evil one. {protect} This is one of many military terms in this chapter (cf. 1Pe 1:3-12; 1Jn 5:18). {from the evil one} This inflected Greek form can be neuter or masculine. The Eastern Church Fathers and Tertullian interpret it as masculine , while the Western Church Fathers interpret it as neuter (cf. Rom 12:9). The NT seems to support the masculine (cf. Mat 5:37; Mat 6:13; Mat 13:19; Mat 13:38; Joh 17:15; Eph 6:16; 1Jn 2:13-14; 1Jn 3:12; 1Jn 5:18-19). This context has two possible orientations: (1) the false teachers of Paul’s day (antichrists, cf. 1Jn 2:18) or (2) the eschatological evil of the Anti-Christ (cf. Revelation 13). Evil is always present, but so too, the faithful Lord! He will rescue and preserve His followers from evil men and He will strengthen and protect them from the evil one. [You Can Understand the Bible by Dr. Bob Utley]

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Verse of the Day (June 23, 2020)

Verse of the Day (June 23, 2020) #BMSeminary – Yahweh Intends to Deliver His People. It is one thing for Yahweh to want to save and another for him to be able to save, but those assertions do not mean much unless he actually intends to save. These verses establish that he does. Although some of the Israelites in exile might say that God does not really care about his people’s plight (“my cause is disregarded,” v. 27; cf. 49:14), perhaps because deliverance does not occur at once, God asserts that as Creator neither his strength nor understanding can be equated with anything in the cosmos. The source of strength is in the realm not of the physical but of the spiritual. The argument is exactly the same as that in ch. 30 (see note on 30:1-18). Those who rush to rely on the strength resident in creation (“youths,” v. 30) will inevitably fail, but those who “hope in” (v. 31) the Lord, the Creator, will discover reservoirs of strength and endurance of which the world knows nothing. [Zondervan Study Bible]
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Verse of the Day (June 22, 2020)

Verse of the Day (June 22, 2020) #BMSeminary – In their ascent to Jerusalem, pilgrims traveled dangerous roads and pathways. Their confidence along the way was focused on the destination point—not merely the “hills” (v. 1) where Jerusalem lay but more importantly the God of those hills and of that city. For this was the covenant God who had promised his people his care, provision, and protection as they walked faithfully with him. Indeed, their help came from the Lord, Yahweh, the God who made the heavens and the earth (v. 2). As they traveled uncertain paths, they knew his presence would never fail (vv. 3–4). Day and night, he would watch over them (vv. 5–6). As people traveled down the Jordan Valley southwards and then turned west to ascend the steep roadway to Jerusalem, the sun would be to their left side. The Lord, then, was likened to the shade on their right hand (v. 5), where comfort and protection was felt. God would keep them from danger as they traveled to and then from the city of God, and throughout all the days of their lives (vv. 7–8). We see, then, the covenant care and grace of God toward his people. As they follow faithfully in his ways, and do what he has called them to do, they can be assured of his watchful presence. The good news of God’s grace toward his people, then, involves not only their past—i.e., forgiveness of sin—but also their futures—i.e., trusting his watchful care of their lives daily as they walk by faith in his power, his promise, and his presence. For we have been united to Christ, whose invincible care for us will never fail—“from this time forth and forevermore” (v. 8; cf. Heb. 13:5–8). [Gospel Transformation Study Bible]
BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (June 21, 2020)

Verse of the Day (June 21, 2020) #BMSeminary – Happy Lord’s Day! Happy Father’s Day to all Dads! When someone experiences God’s grace, he cannot keep it to himself. Consequently, the psalmist’s pronouns quickly shift from “I” to “you” (vv. 1–3; cf. Rom. 1:5–7). God’s titles explain why his grace is commendable. The one who regularly lives in the shelter of the “Most High” will find rest in the shadow of the “Almighty” (Ps. 91:1). This was especially meaningful to Israel, who was homeless for much of the Old Testament. Her refuge was the “LORD,” the “I AM” who met Moses in the burning bush and who is all-sufficient in resources (Ex. 3:14). Even so, he is the believer’s intimate companion (“my God,” v. 2). The psalmist assures us of God’s aggressive defense against every kind of threat: terror at night, arrows by day, pestilence in darkness, destruction at noon (Ps. 91:5–6), along with the lion, the adder, the young lion, and the serpent (v. 13; Luke 10:19; Acts 28:1–6). Yet God’s protection is as tender as a mother bird’s (Ps. 91:4; Deut. 32:11; Matt. 23:37). The “snare of the fowler” represents hidden plots, and “pestilence” represents everything else that threatens in this life (Ps. 91:3; 2 Cor. 4:7–11). Finally, the psalmist prophesies regarding what only a Messiah can deliver: shelter from the future judgment (Ps. 91:7–8; John 12:47). Misapplying this text, the devil urged Jesus to provoke God to an additional proof of his love (Matt. 4:6; cf. Ps. 91:11–12). But God’s pronouncement at Jesus’ baptism was sufficient (Luke 3:22). Likewise, the believer united to Christ is also perpetually assured of loving protection by God’s angels, who represent his presence (Ps. 91:11–13; 34:7; John 14:21). So what began with a human testimony to God’s deliverance from trouble ends with a divine pledge of a “long life” (for those in Christ, eternal life) and of “rescue” and “honor” for the one who “holds fast to [him] in love” (Ps. 91:14–16; John 15:26). [Gospel Transformation Study Bible]

BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (June 20, 2020)

Verse of the Day (June 20, 2020) #BMSeminary – Jesus calls his disciples to let go of self-interest and self-reliance in order to be at Jesus’ disposal. As was the case in the call of Elisha (1 Kings 19:19–21), letting go of self-sufficiency is necessary in order to follow Jesus and his purposes. This radical call is fueled by the gospel, in which all our sins are forgiven and we are reconciled to God through Christ (objectively). And yet our ongoing growth in Christ should continue the process of reversing our profound alienation from God (subjectively), since such a surrendered “walking with God” is the original design for human beings. The follower of Christ realizes the enabling love of him who calls to such radical discipleship, recognizes the impurity in his own heart, and receives the reconciling and purifying work of Jesus on his or her behalf. Thus equipped, the disciple surrenders willingly small and large decisions, wishes, dreams, and so on, about marriage, work, and other aspirations. Such surrender includes the challenge of learning to bear responsibilities while keeping his or her will and thought in a guidable, non-controlling, and prayerful attitude before God. This type of surrender does not end with self-abasement but requires assumption of the status and duties now assigned by our Lord. A disciple must remember: the One he or she surrenders to is good, trustworthy, wise, and powerful. The Master loves his followers and enables their faithfulness. [Gospel Transformation Study Bible]
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Verse of the Day (June 19, 2020)

Verse of the Day (June 19, 2020) #BMSeminary – Jesus Christ is the focal point of history and the reference point for all our obedience. Husbands find in Christ a model for sacrificial, loving, strong, tender headship. Wives find in the church’s submission to Christ a model for intelligent, gracious, trusting, respectful submission. Though these commands may be designed to reverse the sin of Eden (where the woman usurped her husband’s authority and the man relinquished his sacrificial leadership), the Bible never roots these gender roles in the fall, let alone in a certain cultural context. Instead, these roles are meant to be an expression of the unchanging gospel dynamics of Christ’s relationship to the church and the church’s relationship to him. [Gospel Transformation Study Bible]

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Verse of the Day (June 18, 2020)

Verse of the Day (June 18, 2020) #BMSeminary – Fathers can provoke their children to wrath by injustice, loss of temper, undue severity, cruelty, favoritism, suppression, sarcasm, ridicule, and misuse or abuse of authority. Nurture basically means “training,” here denoting spiritual education. Admonition is instruction that points out one’s responsibilities and duties. Of the Lord is in Greek a subjective genitive. This indicates that behind the parents’ rearing and instruction of their children stands the Lord as the chief teacher in child education. Parents do not rear children alone. [KJV Study Bible, HarperCollins]
BMS Updates

Verse of the Day (June 17, 2020)

Verse of the Day (June 17, 2020) #BMSeminary – Though no superscription is found in this psalm, most interpreters agree that it was written when the ark of the Lord was transferred from the house of Obed-edom to the new location on Zion’s mountain (2 Sam. 6:2–18). Certainly it describes the procession attached to that significant event, but it is more than a historical narrative. It is rich with theology since, at that time, God’s person and His place for Israel in the world seem to have been understood in a much deeper way. The procession is first introduced (vv. 1–3). Because the ark represented the presence of God with His people, its movement to a new location is a reflection of God’s continual blessing on His people and conquest of her foes. Next is a call to praise the Lord for His majesty and His care for the needy (vv. 4–6). The present event of relocating the ark is now put into perspective within the history of the Lord’s works (vv. 7–23). Specifically, it is, in a sense, a reliving of the Exodus (vv. 7–10) and of the conquest of Canaan (vv. 11–14). The Lord has clearly elected Zion as His abode from which He protects His people (vv. 15–23). David next describes the procession itself (vv. 24–27) with its singers and players (v. 25) and the various tribes (v. 27). Finally, the psalm concludes with two hymns (vv. 28–35): a hymn of Israel expressing her prayer for continued deliverance (vv. 28–31), and a universalistic hymn that speaks of the Lord’s rule over all the earth (vv. 32–35). The theological significance of this majestic hymn is twofold. First, it reiterates in a beautiful way the Lord’s election of Israel as a basis from which His rule and blessing flow to the earth. Second, it reveals a growing understanding of the person of the God of Israel. A study of the names of God alone in the psalm establishes this second point: God (v. 1), his name JAH (v. 4), the Almighty (v. 14), the LORD (v. 16), the LORD God (v. 18), the Lord (v. 19, a different Hebrew word from the one in v. 16), and GOD the Lord (v. 20). The action of God in deliverance (v. 18) is interpreted messianically by Paul and applied to the ascension of our Lord (Eph. 4:8). [KJV Study Bible, HarperCollins]