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Verse of the Day (February 28, 2020)

Verse of the Day (February 28, 2020) #BMSeminary – Paul urges Timothy to stir up [keep in full flame] the gift of God (the “grace gift” which came from God). By the putting on of my hands: This refers to Timothy’s ordination. The gift was given by God at Timothy’s conversion and officially recognized at his ordination. Power (Gr. dunamis) is the ability to accomplish whatever He wills us to accomplish. Love (Gr. agapē) is volitional love. A sound mind is a disciplined mind. The testimony of our Lord refers to the gospel Paul preached. Me his prisoner indicates that although Paul is actually a prisoner in a dungeon cell in the city of Rome, he regards himself there in the directive will of God. Hence, he is really God’s prisoner, and Rome is merely God’s agent to put him where God wants him. Who hath saved us refers to the ultimate effect: our salvation. And called us with an holy calling looks at the means by which our salvation was effected. His own purpose and grace . . . was given us indicates that our salvation was totally unmerited. Abolished death (“having rendered death ineffective”): By His vicarious death, Christ reversed the curse of sin and brought life [eternal union of the soul with God] and immortality (“incorruption”) which is guaranteed by His resurrection. (KJV Study Bible, HarperCollins)

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Verse of the Day (February 27, 2020)

Verse of the Day (February 27, 2020) #BMSeminary – The noun truth here has been interpreted in various ways: (1) There are a number of interpreters who understand the final noun in this series, truth (ἀληθείᾳ, aletheia) in an adverbial sense (“truly” or “in sincerity”), describing the way in which believers are to love. If the two pairs of nouns are compared, however, it is hard to see how the second noun with tongue (γλώσσῃ, glosse) in the first pair can have an adverbial sense. (2) It seems better to understand the first noun in each pair as produced by the second noun: Words are produced by the tongue, and the (righteous) deeds with which believers are to love one another are produced by the truth. (NET Bible Full Notes)

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Verse of the Day (February 26, 2020)

Verse of the Day (February 26, 2020) #BMSeminary – John introduces the reader to the second of five reasons why Christians love: to follow the supreme example of God’s sacrificial love in sending his Son for us. The judgment of sin on the cross was the supreme example of God’s love, for he poured out his wrath on his beloved Son in place of sinners (John 3:14–16; Rom. 5:8; 2 Cor. 5:21; Eph. 5:1–2; see note on Titus 3:4). only Son. Over half of the NT’s uses of this term are by John (e.g., John 1:14; 3:16; 18). John always uses it of Christ to picture his unique relationship to the Father, his pre-existence, and his distinctness from creation. The term emphasizes the uniqueness of Christ, as the only one of his kind. It was he whom the Father sent into the world as the greatest gift ever given (John 17:3; 2 Cor. 8:9) so that we might have life eternal (cf. John 3:14–15; 12:24). (MacArthur Study Bible)

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Verse of the Day (February 25, 2020)

Verse of the Day (February 25, 2020) #BMSeminary – The greatest commandment is stated in Deu 6:5. There is a slight difference between the Masoretic Hebrew text and Jesus’ quote, but the essence is the same. This verse is not concerned with the dichotomous (cf. Heb 4:12) or trichotomous (cf. 1Th 5:23) nature of man but rather deals with a person as a unity (cf. Gen 2:7; 1Co 15:45): a thinking and feeling, physical and spiritual being. It is true that because humans are earthly animals they depend upon this planet for food, water, air, and all the other things animal life needs to survive. Humans are also spiritual beings who relate to God and the spiritual realms. However, it is a false interpretation to build theology on these different descriptions of human nature. The key to this verse is the thrice-repeated “all,” not the supposed distinctions between “heart,” ” soul,” and “mind.” By quoting this central affirmation of the oneness of God, Jesus is inseparably linking the OT and NT understanding of God. The NT is the fulfillment of the OT. YHWH is now revealed as a Triune Unity. Oneness has been redefined! NT believers fully assert monotheism, but with a footnote. Apparently the NT writers did not see the implication of Psa 110:1 as a contradiction (cf. 1Co 8:6; Eph 4:5; Php 2:11). There is surely mystery here! See the Special Topic: The Trinity at Mat 3:17. The second commandment was not requested by the scribe, but it does show that a balance between believers’love for God and their love for their fellow human must be maintained. It is impossible to love God and hate people (cf. 1Jn 2:9; 1Jn 2:11; 1Jn 3:15; 1Jn 4:20). This is a quote from Lev 19:18. (You Can Understand the Bible by Dr. Bob Utley)

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Verse of the Day (February 24, 2020)

Verse of the Day (February 24, 2020) #BMSeminary – This beautiful passage is an affirmation that the covenant has not been totally revoked. God would fulfill His Deuteronomic agreement with His people after this period of judgment (cf. Deuteronomy 27-28, 30; Leviticus 26). The emphasis here is that His people must return to Him. Only a spiritually renewed remnant will return and be blessed. Notice the conditions of blessing. (1) you call upon Me; (2) come to Me, cf. Jer 33:3; Isa 55:6; (3) pray to Me; (4) seek me, cf. Deu 4:29; (5)search for Me with all your heart, cf. Deu 4:29; Jer 24:7. All of these denote a worship experience that has become a lifestyle relationship. Notice how YHWH responds (possible allusion to Deu 30:3-5). (1) I will listen to you, Jer 29:12, cf. Jer 33:3; (2)you will find Me, Jer 29:13, cf. Deu 4:29; (3) I will be found by you, Jer 29:14; (4) I will restore your fortunes (term often used of repenting); (5) I will gather you from all the nations, cf. Jer 23:3; Jer 31:8; (6) I will bring you back (i.e., to Palestine). The PRONOUN “I” (אנכי, BDB 59) is repeated twice for emphasis. YHWH will bring about His plans and purposes for His people. YHWH’s plan of restoration is clarified: (1) for welfare; (2)not for calamity (such a common word in Jeremiah); (3)give you a future – the people’s existence, posterity, cf. Pro 23:18; esp. Pro 24:14; (4)give you a hope, cf. Pro 23:18; Pro 24:14; Eze 37:11. (You Can Understand the Bible by Dr. Bob Utley)

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Verse of the Day (February 23, 2020)

Verse of the Day (February 23, 2020) #BMSeminary – Happy Lord’s Day! The verb חָרַשׁ (kharash) means (1) literally: “to cut in; to engrave; to plow,” describing the work of a craftsman; and (2) figuratively: “to devise,” describing the mental activity of planning evil (what will harm people) in the first colon, and planning good (what will benefit them) in the second colon. (NET Bible Full Notes)

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Verse of the Day (February 22, 2020)

Verse of the Day (February 22, 2020) #BMSeminary – The entire phrase fear has to do with punishment may be understood in two slightly different ways: (1) “fear has its own punishment” or (2) “fear has to do with [includes] punishment.” These are not far apart, however, and the real key to understanding the expression lies in the meaning of the word “punishment” (κόλασις, kolasis). While it may refer to torture or torment (BDAG 555 s.v. 1) there are numerous Koine references involving eternal punishment (2 Macc 4:38; T. Reu. 5:5; T. Gad 7:5) and this is also the use in the only other NT reference, Matt 25:46. In the present context, where the author has mentioned having confidence in the day of judgment (4:17), it seems virtually certain that eternal punishment (or fear of it) is what is meant here. The (only) alternative to perfected love, which results in confidence at the day of judgment, is fear, which has to do with the punishment one is afraid of receiving at the judgment. As 4:18b states, “the one who fears [punishment] has not been perfected in love.” It is often assumed by interpreters that the opposite to perfected love (which casts out fear) is imperfect love (which still has fear and therefore no assurance). This is possible, but it is not likely, because the author nowhere mentions ‘imperfect’ love, and for him the opposite of ‘perfected’ love appears to be not imperfect love but hate (cf. 4:20). In other words, in the antithetical (‘either/or’) categories in which the author presents his arguments, one is either a genuine believer, who becomes ‘perfected’ in love as he resides in love and in a mutually indwelling relationship with God (cf. 4:16b), or one is not a genuine believer at all, but one who (like the opponents) hates his brother, is a liar, and does not know God at all. This individual should well fear judgment and eternal punishment because in the author’s view that is precisely where such a person is headed. (NET Bible Full Notes)