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Free Bible Commentary (Tagalog) – Mark, 1 and 2 Peter (Episode 033)

Free Bible Commentary (Tagalog) – Mark, 1 and 2 Peter (Episode 033)

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Verse of the Day (October 23, 2020)

Verse of the Day (October 23, 2020) #BMSeminary – A serving Christian lends a helping hand with heavy loads (barē, cf. comments on v. 5). Though the principle would apply to all burdens the context has special reference to the heavy and oppressive weight of temptation and spiritual failure. While the “spiritual” do the work of restoring, all believers are to become involved by prayer and encouragement. This, wrote Paul, will fulfill (anaplērōsete) the law of Christ, that is, the principle of love (cf. 5:14; John 13:34). [Bible Knowledge Commentary]

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Verse of the Day (October 22, 2020)

Verse of the Day (October 22, 2020) #BMSeminary – In verses 23, 30, 33 the second line begins with and, pointing up synonymous parallelism (see “Literary Style” in the Introduction). Appropriately spoken words (cf. 25:11-12), saying the right thing at the right time, delights (samakh; see comments on 15:20) not only the hearer but also the one who says them. Timely words (whether of love, encouragement, rebuke, or peacemaking) are beneficial. [Bible Knowledge Commentary]

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Verse of the Day (October 21, 2020)

Verse of the Day (October 21, 2020) #BMSeminary – He Put a New Song in My Mouth . . . You Are My God, Do Not Delay. This psalm is a mixed one in that it carries a twofold message of what a believer’s experience may be like: (1) David praises God for deliverance, affirming the wonders that God performs, using the language common to many praise or thanksgiving psalms (vv. 1-10). (2) David cries out for God to save him from his enemies, using the language of standard lament psalms (vv. 11-17). In the ebb and flow of the Psalter, we find many psalms of one type or the other, but only rarely do we find what could be a stand-alone psalm knitted together like this one (see Pss 44; 89). The message is that even when God answers prayer and provides relief (vv. 1-10), there will usually come a new crisis that forces a return to God as one’s refuge and deliverer (vv. 11-17). Ps 70 slightly revises vv. 13-17. [Zondervan Study Bible]

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Verse of the Day (October 20, 2020)

Verse of the Day (October 20, 2020) #BMSeminary – As a corrective for his sinful nature, David petitioned God for inward renewal of his heart attitude (v. 10), preservation in service (v. 11), and restoration of joy (v. 12). He was aware that he had become indifferent in his attitudes so he needed renovation. He was also aware that Saul was removed from the kingship for his sin (signified in the OT by the departure of the Holy Spirit), so David asked that God not take away His Spirit and depose him too. In the New Testament the Spirit does not leave believers; at the moment of salvation He indwells them (cf. John 14:16; Rom. 8:9). But a Christian may be cast aside from service because of sin (cf. 1 Cor. 9:27). David was also aware that in order to experience the joy he once had in his salvation, he needed God’s inner spiritual renewal. [Bible Knowledge Commentary]

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Verse of the Day (October 19, 2020)

Verse of the Day (October 19, 2020) #BMSeminary – The psalm is written in the form of an acrostic, although our numbering is out of step with the Hebrew. There is no logical outline to the psalm, so it is best studied according to its topics. The major point of the psalm seems to be that the wicked’s prosperity is short-lived. Though David was troubled by the prosperity of the unrighteous, he knew by faith that their undeserved bounty would be cut off. His underlying belief is that God will intervene in His time. Then the present, temporary reversal of fortunes will be set right and the righteous “shall inherit the earth” (vv. 9, 11, 22, 29, 34). The mention of inheriting the earth would be encouraging and uplifting to the pious Israelite since all of God’s blessing was connected with the Promised Land. In contrast to this blessed destiny the wicked “shall be cut off,” an expression used often in the Old Testament of a violent death. The psalm also contains a simple formula for achieving peace of mind in the face of the wicked’s prosperity: fret not . . . neither be thou envious (v. 1), trust . . . do good (v. 3), delight thyself also in the LORD (v. 4), commit thy way . . . trust (v. 5), rest . . . wait patiently . . . fret not (v. 7), cease from anger . . . forsake wrath . . . fret not (v. 8). All of these exhortations urge the believer to confidently trust the Lord with all of life’s problems. The psalm concludes appropriately with an undying affirmation of faith and trust in the unchanging character of God. [KJV Study Bible, HarperCollins]

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Verse of the Day (October 18, 2020)

Verse of the Day (October 18, 2020) #BMSeminary – Happy Lord’s Day! Wherever the believer is, he can find a way to the throne of grace by prayer. God calls us by his Spirit, by his word, by his worship, and by special providences, merciful and afflicting. When we are foolishly making court to lying vanities, God is, in love to us, calling us to seek our own mercies in him. The call is general, “Seek ye my face;” but we must apply it to ourselves, “I will seek it.” The word does us no good, when we do not ourselves accept the exhortation: a gracious heart readily answers to the call of a gracious God, being made willing in the day of his power. The psalmist requests the favor of the Lord; the continuance of his presence with him; the benefit of Divine guidance, and the benefit of Divine protection. God’s time to help those that trust in him, is, when all other helpers fail. He is a surer and better Friend than earthly parents are, or can be. What was the belief which supported the psalmist? That he should see the goodness of the Lord. There is nothing like the believing hope of eternal life, the foresights of that glory, and foretastes of those pleasures, to keep us from fainting under all calamities. In the mean time he should be strengthened to bear up under his burdens. Let us look unto the suffering Savior, and pray in faith, not to be delivered into the hands of our enemies. Let us encourage each other to wait on the Lord, with patient expectation, and fervent prayer. [Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary]